Announcing the 2013 National Youth Justice Training!

I’m incredibly excited to serve as an alumni consultant during the development of this year’s National Youth Justice Training, and can’t wait to see program come to fruition in the following months. This transformative three-week social justice training for high-school youth offers interactive social justice education and real-world internships.

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8 Online Interfaith Resources for Youth in Rural Areas

After last week’s #DCfaith twitter chat, I began thinking more about my experiences with interfaith in my small town. Although at least one interfaith group exists where I live, I never seem to hear about events until after they’ve already happened, and as far as I know, none of them have been specifically for youth.

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Faitheist: A Review by a High-School Atheist!

I myself am an atheist as well as a Unitarian Universalist, and I found Faitheist incredibly inspiring, both as a manifesto for atheist interfaith work, and as a human story of changing belief and perspective. I often find myself agreeing with many New Atheist critiques of mainstream religion, as well as pluralistic messages of interfaith understanding and engagement, and Faitheist helped me resolve the conflicted feelings about religion and interfaith work I still, to a certain degree, hold.

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In the War on Women, We Are Winning.

I spent this election cycle surrounded by women passionate about protecting our access to healthcare and contraception, our equal pay for equal work, and our protection against sexual abuse and violence; but, I didn’t realize until after Missouri’s Senate race was called as a victory for McCaskill by the news networks how legitimately terrified I had been at the prospect of a win for Akin. I screamed, my best friend called me crying, and my social media feeds exploded in celebration.

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Interfaith Activism and UU Identity – My Journey

It seems to me that all too often, policies which in reality limit religious liberty are sold to the populous on the grounds of “freedom of religion” and voted or signed in to law without much more thought. In a state where, according to the 2008 American Religious Identification Survey, only 3% of the population is a part of a religion other than Christianity (fourteen percent identify as Nones and five percent refused to answer the survey), campaign rhetoric often focuses on which candidate is a “better” Christian, and doesn’t say much about policy.

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